I just read Betterness by Umair Haque and you should too. Here are some of my favorite quotes: "Call me an unrepentant optimist, but I’d bet that billions of brow-mopping person hours spent on bigger SUVs, smellier deodorants, and jumbo-sized fast food isn’t the lofty apex of humankind’s untrammeled potential.""What if the great challenge for enterprise in the twenty-first century is no longer merely manufacturing the alluring, spotlit glamour of mass-produced opulence, but cultivating a more authentic plenitude that matters in human terms?""I call this positive paradigm betterness; in contrast with business, it’s not about being busier and busier (to what end?) but about becoming better."“Why is it that the globe’s trillions of person-hours of human effort are dedicated to … designer diapers, disposable clothes, and pet Prozac?”"We’re busy. But are we any better off?""A good life is about more than quantity of gross product, denominated in nominal income. It’s about net real wealth. And real wealth, in turn, consists of much more than mere money.""A good life is composed more of what you can’t buy than what you can.""Betterness says: ‘Through the act of exchange, I’ll ignite your human potential. You will be and become better—fitter, smarter, closer, wiser, tougher, humbler, truer, wealthier in terms that add up to a life meaningfully well lived.’”"What kind of products won’t we offer? What products and services will we discourage people from consuming?""Companies in betterness blow past that obsolete, outdated, tired, threadbare industrial-age idea: they have the ambition to return more than just financial capital. They are economic engines for returning the many different higher-order kinds of capital, because financial capital is the least valuable, enduring, and meaningful kind of capital.""Constraints ask: What actions will we guard ourselves from, so the Common Wealth isn’t damaged?""So here’s our anomaly: that industrial-age wealth hasn’t neatly powered lives lived meaningfully well; that near-term profit, gross product, and hyperconsumption haven’t produced a fuller real human prosperity; that the frenzied pursuit of opulence hasn’t been sufficient for the attainment of a good life—of eudaimonia.""A life well lived is a consequence of human choice: the decision to pursue the significant over the trivial, the enduring over the evanescent, and the meaningful over the useless. So here’s my challenge—live one."

I just read Betterness by Umair Haque and you should too. 

Here are some of my favorite quotes: 

"Call me an unrepentant optimist, but I’d bet that billions of brow-mopping person hours spent on bigger SUVs, smellier deodorants, and jumbo-sized fast food isn’t the lofty apex of humankind’s untrammeled potential."

"What if the great challenge for enterprise in the twenty-first century is no longer merely manufacturing the alluring, spotlit glamour of mass-produced opulence, but cultivating a more authentic plenitude that matters in human terms?"

"I call this positive paradigm betterness; in contrast with business, it’s not about being busier and busier (to what end?) but about becoming better."

“Why is it that the globe’s trillions of person-hours of human effort are dedicated to … designer diapers, disposable clothes, and pet Prozac?”

"We’re busy. But are we any better off?"

"A good life is about more than quantity of gross product, denominated in nominal income. It’s about net real wealth. And real wealth, in turn, consists of much more than mere money."

"A good life is composed more of what you can’t buy than what you can."

"Betterness says: ‘Through the act of exchange, I’ll ignite your human potential. You will be and become better—fitter, smarter, closer, wiser, tougher, humbler, truer, wealthier in terms that add up to a life meaningfully well lived.’”

"What kind of products won’t we offer? What products and services will we discourage people from consuming?"

"Companies in betterness blow past that obsolete, outdated, tired, threadbare industrial-age idea: they have the ambition to return more than just financial capital. They are economic engines for returning the many different higher-order kinds of capital, because financial capital is the least valuable, enduring, and meaningful kind of capital."

"Constraints ask: What actions will we guard ourselves from, so the Common Wealth isn’t damaged?"

"So here’s our anomaly: that industrial-age wealth hasn’t neatly powered lives lived meaningfully well; that near-term profit, gross product, and hyperconsumption haven’t produced a fuller real human prosperity; that the frenzied pursuit of opulence hasn’t been sufficient for the attainment of a good life—of eudaimonia."

"A life well lived is a consequence of human choice: the decision to pursue the significant over the trivial, the enduring over the evanescent, and the meaningful over the useless. So here’s my challenge—live one."


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